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Home  > Article

Should I show a prospective employer my pay stub?

Salary.com

If a prospective employer asks to see a paystub from your current job, it could be a sign of mistrust that will be difficult to repair once you are hired.

Q. I am in negotiation with an employer for a higher position than the one I currently hold. They are asking that I send them a pay stub. I told them you can't really compare both positions, as the responsibilities and duties are so different. However, they keep insisting. I am trying to hold my ground. Please help.

A. You know, an employer-employee relationship is based on trust and good faith. When a company asks you to produce a pay stub, it means they don't believe you are making the amount of money you claim you are making; or they are trying to validate what someone in your position actually should make. Whatever the reason, the relationship is unlikely to get better after you start working there.

Now, it is always possible for a company to confirm your previous salary, but as you stated, they are unrelated issues. You have to ask yourself how much you really want to work for this company.

I doubt they have an HR professional working there, because most HR professionals are more concerned with whether a candidate can perform the necessary skills outlined for the position. Most companies would have gone to survey vendors to determine how much the job is worth so that they could make a competitive offer. Most HR professionals would not waste their time trying to persuade candidates to turn over their pay stubs.

I would tread very carefully. If you do decide to work for this company, nothing should really surprise you later on.

Good luck.

- Erisa Ojimba, Certified Compensation Professional


Copyright 2000-2004 © Salary.com, Inc.






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