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Home  > Article

How much should I get for changing jobs?

Salary.com

Do you expect to receive a pay increase when changing jobs? To a prospective employer, it doesn't matter that you're changing jobs - it only matters where your pay falls in relation to the rest of the market. So, research the market when setting your expectations.

Q. What is the typical increase a person should get (or should look for) when changing jobs? I'm in the information technology field.

A. There is no rule of thumb for determining a percentage increase for a new job, because the value of someone's skills relates to how that person compares with the market as a whole. You probably won't want to change jobs unless you feel you will be better off in the new situations.

Before you settle on your new salary expectations, understand the job responsibilities at the new employer, and then benchmark those responsibilities against a job in the Salary Wizard. This will give you an idea of what the market is paying.

Next, list the compensatory benefits you're receiving at your current job and compare them against what the new company is offering you. Remember to include things like health benefits, company-paid training, and vacation days.

If your new job has the same responsibilities as your current job, make sure your new rate of pay brings you close to the 50th percentile of the market, based on the data in the Salary Wizard. If the new job has more responsibility than your current job, make sure your salary falls between the 25th and the 50th percentiles.

Finally, negotiate benefits comparable to or better than the benefits you currently have.

Good luck.

- Erisa Ojimba, Certified Compensation Consultant


Copyright 2000-2004 © Salary.com, Inc.






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