Open

Employer Spotlight

Recruit Gen Y Stars

You need new tools to attract the new breed of talent - Experience will help you build your team with Gen Y stars.

Go

Ease of Use

Our management dashboard helps you easily post jobs, pinpoint targeted candidates and manage your talent pipeline.

Go

All Needles, No Hay

Don't wait for the best candidates to come to your door - with Experience, you can proactively target top talent.

Go

Build Your Experience

Experience is your most important asset - we're here to help you find that next opportunity.

Go

Tell Your Story

You're so much more than just your resume. Showcase your Experience.

Go

Connections Matter

Introductions are made easy when you have Experience -- connect with alumni, mentors and industry insiders.

Go
Forgot?

Use eRecruiting by Experience on campus?
Find your school here.

Home  > Article

Shaking Things Up in Education

By Kevin Murphy

Twenty-somethings are focused on increasing teacher salaries and improving access to higher education.

 
Until teachers are paid more, most people in our age group will go start a dot-com instead.
 
According to the youth activist group Third Millennium and the nonpartisan web site the Freedom Channel, the most important issue for today's twentysomethings-as it is with our boomer parents-is education. While the electorally crucial soccer moms are concerned with subjects like classroom size, school choice, and national standards, twentysomethings are focused on increasing teacher salaries and improving access to higher education.

"Teachers educate our kids-perhaps the hardest job out there-and make only 35K," says David Demian, a 25-year-old law student. Most of the twentysomethings we talked to agreed. "What else is there to say?" Wolff says."Until teachers are paid more, most people in our age group will go start a dot-com instead."

Making college and graduate school available and affordable to all also weighs in as a major concern. "These days a high school degree gets you less and less in the job market," says Daniel Sanchez, 25, a robotics engineer. "Yet college keeps costing more and more. Something's got to give."

Indeed, according to U.S. News and World Report, while the median family income for the parents of college-age children has increased just 12 percent since 1980 (after adjusting for inflation), the average tuition at a four-year college has more than doubled. And while 70 percent of full-time students now receive some form of financial aid, today's twentysomethings are more often than not graduating with sizable education loans that restrict their postcollege choices from the get-go.







Google Web Search
Didn't see what you were looking for?
 
powered by Google
Copyright ©2017 Experience, Inc Privacy Policy Terms of Service