Open

Employer Spotlight

Recruit Gen Y Stars

You need new tools to attract the new breed of talent - Experience will help you build your team with Gen Y stars.

Go

Ease of Use

Our management dashboard helps you easily post jobs, pinpoint targeted candidates and manage your talent pipeline.

Go

All Needles, No Hay

Don't wait for the best candidates to come to your door - with Experience, you can proactively target top talent.

Go

Build Your Experience

Experience is your most important asset - we're here to help you find that next opportunity.

Go

Tell Your Story

You're so much more than just your resume. Showcase your Experience.

Go

Connections Matter

Introductions are made easy when you have Experience -- connect with alumni, mentors and industry insiders.

Go
Forgot?

Use eRecruiting by Experience on campus?
Find your school here.

Home  > Article

Can someone with an associate's degree be paid more than I am?

Salary.com

Although more education can translate to higher pay, it's not always so, as in the case of the employee in a job that requires a bachelor's degree but pays less than a different job that requires only an associate's degree.

Q. At work, two departments have two separate requirements. One requires a four-year bachelor's degree with a lower starting salary than the other, which requires only a two-year associate's degree. Is this appropriate?

A. I know of no legal precedent requiring employers to pay someone with a bachelor's degree more than someone with an associate's degree. If your company has a compensation strategy that pays its employees based on competence and skill sets, it is possible that someone with an associate's degree would get paid more than an employee with a bachelor's degree.

I can't say whether it is appropriate to pay employees with an associate's degrees more than employees with a bachelor's degree because I don't know what jobs and departments you are referring to. For instance, some IT jobs that require only an associate's degree will pay more than some jobs in accounting.

Your company will only run into problems if it applies its policies inconsistently. It shouldn't require one employee to have a bachelor's degree, and pay someone without a bachelor's more money in the same position.

Good luck.

- Erisa Ojimba, Certified Compensation Professional


Copyright 2000-2004 © Salary.com, Inc.






More Related Articles


Sports in the Office: How to Make Sure You Have Your Bases Covered
The fact that sports has its own daily section in every major newspaper tells you something about its significance in our society, and it's an ideal icebreaker in many business settings, especially when peers are unaware of any other common ground.

Job Seeking On-the-Job
You may have already discovered that looking for a new job while you're employed can involve a few Clark Kent impersonations (i.e., transforming into a suit-and-tie interviewee in the confines of a phone booth or the back seat of a cab), but what else should you know about a stealth job search? We've gone out and searched for a few tricks of the trade.

Wise Beyond Your Years: The Challenges of Young Managers
Your baby face has never been such a liability. Young professionals with "fresh energy and new perspective" are being tapped for management positions, but age-related skepticism is a challenge for these new managers.



Google Web Search
Didn't see what you were looking for?
 
powered by Google
Copyright ©2017 Experience, Inc Privacy Policy Terms of Service