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Home  > Article

How do I get the raise I was promised?

Salary.com

It's OK to remind an employer of their verbal promise to review your salary six months after starting a job.

Q. When I started in my new job six months ago, the salary was not exactly what I asked for. My employers promised me verbally that they would review my performance in six months and raise my salary then. How should I approach this since they have not mentioned it since? What kind of an increase should I ask for?

A. As I have often advised, verbal agreements don't mean very much. However, you may consider sending your employers an email reminding them of the promise they made to you. At the same time, ask them what their merit practices or policies have been in the past. What, for instance, was the average increase for the average performer in your company?

Keep in mind that a salary increase is contingent on your performance. So before you ask for it, ask your employers to rate your performance. Also ask them if the increase will be prorated for six months, and remember to find out when your next review will be...in writing.

Good luck.

- Erisa Ojimba, Certified Compensation Professional


Copyright 2000-2004 © Salary.com, Inc.






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