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Home  > Article

Which Movie Boss Do You Have?

By Laura Morsch, CareerBuilder.com

We go to see movies to be entertained and get a temporary break from reality. Sometimes, though, the characters and situations on screen seem eerily familiar.

Maybe this is because we feel Oscar-worthy ourselves sometimes. According to a recent CareerBuilder.com survey, 26 percent of workers feel like they are "acting" at work. No wonder "Office Space" and "Weekend at Bernie's" became cult classics.

Office Drama
Sometimes the 9-to-5 grind can seem pretty dramatic. A CareerBuilder.com study of 1,333 workers found that almost 36 percent say if their workplace were a movie, it would be a drama --  full of ups, downs and intricate storylines.

Interestingly, women find their workplaces more dramatic than men do - 43 percent of women characterized their jobs this way, compared with just 28 percent of men!

Some workers are able to find the lighter side of the workday. Twenty-seven percent of workers say their office's movie would be a comedy, and 19 percent categorized theirs as a heart-pumping action/adventure flick.

A less fortunate 7 percent say their job is like a horror movie, and about 6 percent called theirs a mystery. (The case of the missing stapler, perhaps?)

Bosses
Every star needs a supporting actor -- in this case, your boss. Of all the movie bosses out there, these 10 reminded workers most of their own head honchos:

1. Andrew Shepherd, "The American President."
Friendly, popular but can sometimes make things difficult.

2. Obi-Wan Kenobi, "Star Wars."
Wise, loyal and always there for guidance.

3. Bill Lumbergh, "Office Space."
Evil boss who loves tormenting employees and making them work weekends.

4. Coach Norman Dale, "Hoosiers."
Uses brash, unconventional tactics to motivate to success.

5. Franklin Hart, "9 to 5."
"Sexist, egotistical, lying, hypocritical bigot."

6. Katherine Parker, "Working Girl."
Back-stabbing boss who steals your ideas and passes them off as her own.

7. Bernie Lomax, "Weekend at Bernie's."
A crook who's out to get rid of you.

8. Dr. Evil, "Austin Powers"
Has two obsessions: himself and total world domination.

9. Cruella De Vil, "101 Dalmatians"
Rich, powerful and so mean she'd kill puppies.

10. Gordon Gekko, "Wall Street"
Unfriendly workaholic who expects the same from you.

If you have a boss like these last few, you're not alone. Thirty-seven percent of workers plan to award themselves a new job before the next Oscars!


Laura Morsch is a writer for CareerBuilder.com.

Copyright 2008 CareerBuilder.com. All rights reserved. The information contained in this article may not be published, broadcast or otherwise distributed without prior written authority.






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