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Home  > Article

How do I get the raise I thought I was promised?

Salary.com

Face-to-face is a great way to hear good news, such as news of a raise. But you've got to get it in writing too.

Q.I was promised by my supervisor, but not in writing, that the company would increase my pay by 10 percent. When I got my raise, it was only 3 percent. I questioned my supervisor, who said she never promised me more. We talked it over and compromised at a 7 percent raise. It is now a month later and I have yet to see any increase on my paycheck. How can I get the raise I thought I was promised?

A. In this age of the Internet it is always a good idea to send an email confirming any conversation you have with your supervisor or your human resources department. This way, if you misunderstood what your supervisor said, it gives him or her an opportunity to correct the misunderstanding.

But the issue now is how to get the money that was promised to you. Simply ask for it. Go back to your supervisor and ask when you should expect to see your salary increase on your paycheck. And if the increase does not appear on the date he or she tells you it should, ask what you should do, or with whom you should speak, to ensure that you do receive your increase.

It could be that your paperwork is sitting on someone's desk and they simply have not signed it or sent it to the payroll department. In any event, get confirmation of when your increase will occur and then send an email confirming your conversation.

Good luck.

- Erisa Ojimba, Certified Compensation Professional


Copyright 2000-2004 © Salary.com, Inc.






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