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Home  > Article

Is it time to ask again for my raise?

Salary.com

Have you ever gotten a verbal promise from an employer, then later on wished you had gotten it in writing? Be careful when saying yes to offers that involve future pay increases that aren't in writing.

Q. I've been in this job for five months. I started out as a data entry clerk and was promoted to project manager in the first six weeks. At the time, I was promised a salary increase after a trial period of two months. But it hasn't happened yet. I was also supposed to get a three-month review, should I ask for that also? I love my job and love to come to work every day.

A. First of all, a project manager is a very general job title, so ask your manager to come up with a more definitive title.

I would strongly urge you to send an email to your manager reminding him or her about the agreement to adjust your salary. Ask the manager when you should expect to see the increase in your paycheck.

I would also forward the email to the HR department. Ask them about your company's process for promotional increases, how the long it takes, and when you should receive your increase in your paycheck.

Verbal agreements are always risky, not because you shouldn't trust your manager, but because people can get so busy that they forget what they promise people. Having it in writing helps to jog people's memories.

Once you have received your monetary increase, take the same approach to asking for your performance review. Find out what the process is, and how your evaluation will be included during your merit increase. During your performance evaluation, look for other ways to increase your opportunities in the company. What are your manager's expectations of your performance, and what skill sets should you enhance to become a more valuable asset to the company?

Good luck.

- Erisa Ojimba, Certified Compensation Professional


Copyright 2000-2004 © Salary.com, Inc.






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