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Home  > Article

Should part-time and full-time workers be paid different rates?

Salary.com

If two identical employees worked for the same employer, one part time and one full time, they might expect to be paid at the same rate. But sometimes full-time employees earn more or are expected to contribute more than part-time colleagues.

Q. Should there be a difference in wages between a part-time employee and a full-time employee doing the same job?

A. In general, there should be little to no difference in pay between part-time and full-time employees, particularly when the employees are performing the same job with the same skill sets.

It is possible for a full-time employee to make more money if the person has more experience than a part-time employee. And often, employers expect more from full-time employees than they expect from employees who work less than 40 hours a week. Even if a full-time employee is paid more money, it is typically based on the criteria mentioned above.

Ask your HR department if your company values part-time and full-time employees the same. If your company does pay your part-time employees differently, ask your employer to explain the rationale.

Good luck.

- Erisa Ojimba, Certified Compensation Consultant


Copyright 2000-2004 © Salary.com, Inc.






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