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Home  > Article

The Forecast is Sunny for Jobs in the Sports Industry, But it Might Not be Your Grandpa's Game

By Laura Gordon

Increasing spectator accessibility and leisure time ensure rapid growth of the sports industry, but perhaps this comes at the cost of the integrity of old-school amateurism.

Disillusioned fans may scorn money-making superstars and poor behavior, but they seem never to be able to turn their backs on their beloved sports.

In 2002 about 158,000 athletes, coaches and umpires were included in the American workforce. Overall, the arts, entertainment, and recreation industry provided about 12.8 million jobs in 2005.

Experts forecast growth in this sector will be faster than average growth for all industries, thanks to increased leisure time, rising incomes, and developing technologies such as high-speed bandwidth and HDTV.

This growth has led to increases in advertising sales and sponsorships and ownership changes. Thus, the shift in the sports industry has created a fast-paced money-making machine as intense as the games themselves.

Yet this transformation has also created a disillusioned older generation that is less willing to pay the exorbitant prices for courtside tickets and a younger attention interested in more exotic sports like BMX, snowboarding, and NASCAR racing.

Buying and selling teams and stadiums can be both enormously profitable and highly publicized. Fans in England went up in arms when famous soccer team Manchester United was sold to American owners, while silly disputes over titles, such as the "Los Angeles Angels of Anaheim," have annoyed and frustrated baseball lovers.

Combined with unsportsmanlike antics like head-butting, steroid scandals, and immoral behavior, recent events may cause certain companies to back down from individual sponsorships and focus instead on team promotion.

Corporate support notwithstanding, the sports industry offers much reliability in the fact that fans and athletes alike will never lose their competitive spirit or their love of the game.

 







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